Perhaps not for browsers

If you tend to spend hours upon hours in the bookstore, this is probably not for you:

September 2014: Yoshiyuki Morioka, a bookseller who had been running a store in Tokyo, Japan for 10 years, had a curious thought. Lots of customers, it seemed, dropped in during book launches and other events to buy the same title; others often appeared overwhelmed by all the extra variety. So why not start a bookstore that only sold one book at a time?

Now, Morioka Shoten — Morioka’s new venture that threw open its doors in Tokyo’s trendy Ginza shopping district in May 2015 — operates around that very principle. The store stocks multiple copies of only one carefully selected tome each week, aiming to maximize the joy and intimacy of book-buying for enthusiastic readers. Morioka Shoten has been dubbed both an “anti-Amazon” and a “minimalist solution” to the crippling indecision that customers tend to face when standing among the teetering shelves of traditional bookstores.

Among Morioka’s previously-stocked items:

Books that have been displayed so far include Swedish-Finnish author Tove Jansson’s The True Deceiver, Hans Christian Andersen’s Fairy Tales, and works from well-known Japanese writers like Mimei Ogawa and Akito Akagi. Each title is displayed for six days in a row — Tuesday to Sunday — and then swapped out for a new book.

Sales so far: about 2,000 books. It isn’t Amazon, but it’s not bad for fewer than 50 titles.

(Via Fark.)

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2 comments »

  1. fillyjonk »

    8 February 2016 · 8:57 pm

    I’m wondering how much the FOMO/”limited edition” idea affects sales. Are people more likely to buy a book if they think they will lose the chance to?

  2. CGHill »

    8 February 2016 · 9:01 pm

    I can’t speak for anyone else, but I would definitely feel the push.

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